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Vaccines for Travelers for Patients

If you are planning to travel abroad, it is important to make sure you have the recommended vaccines before your trip. Plan to see your health care provider at least 4 to 6 weeks before you depart to find out which vaccines you should get. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) breaks vaccines down into those that are routine, required, and recommended. Make sure you are up to date on routine vaccines. The required and recommended vaccines you may need will depend on where you are going.

Visit the CDC’s Travelers' Health Page to learn about staying healthy while traveling. There you’ll find a destinations page with a list of countries and the vaccines needed for visiting them.

The CDC provides additional information for pregnant or breastfeeding travelers. Some travel vaccines are not recommended for pregnant women. If you plan to travel and might become pregnant, it is best to get vaccines at least 1 month before pregnancy occurs. This helps to ensure that your body has enough time to build immunity against the diseases you may be exposed to. If that is not possible, getting vaccines against most infections during pregnancy is safe. See CDC’s page on Pregnant Travelers for more information.  If you are breastfeeding and plan to travel, both you and your baby should get safe, recommended vaccines. The vaccine for yellow fever is not known to be safe for breastfeeding infants. If possible, breastfeeding mothers should avoid travel to countries where yellow fever exists. If travel cannot be avoided, the mother should get the vaccine.

Click the links below to find a health department or travel clinic in your region that will give you the vaccines recommended by the CDC before your trip.

 CDC Clinic Search

 HealthMap Vaccine Finder

Global Immunizations

While the resources above focus on preparing travelers to leave the United States, the reverse trip is just as important. Infectious diseases know no boundaries, and it is extremely important to ensure that every person has access to safe and timely immunizations. The CDC has extensive resources regarding global immunization activities for providers and patients. They’ve also published reports on various topics such as vaccination coverage in Haiti, research priorities for global measles and rubella, and maternal and child health interventions in Somalia. Click the CDC link below to learn more about these efforts.

In addition, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Foundation, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have partnered to invest in vaccine delivery systems throughout the developing world. Click the links below to learn more about these global partnerships to improve and ensure the health of the global population.

·         CDC Global Vaccines and Immunization

·         GAVI Alliance

·         World Health Organization

·         United Nations Foundation: Shot at Life

Last Updated: 9/17/2013

Vaccines for Travelers for Ob-Gyns

If your patients are making plans to travel abroad, especially those who are pregnant or breastfeeding, they may contact you for information to remain safe and healthy while abroad. Advance planning is essential as some individuals may need a series of immunizations prior to traveling internationally. Please direct your patients to the Travelers' Health Page provided by the CDC to learn what vaccines needed to keep individuals and families healthy while traveling abroad.

While your office might not offer the required vaccines for traveling patients, it is important to refer patients to a place where these immunizations are given. Search here or here to find a health department or travel clinic in your region that will provide your patients with the vaccinations recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prior to leaving the country.

 The CDC provides further information if your patients are pregnant or breastfeeding.

 CDC Travel Health Updates

Global Immunizations

While the resources above focus on preparing travelers to leave the United States, the reverse trip is just as important. Infectious diseases know no boundaries, and it is extremely important to ensure that every person has access to safe and timely immunizations. The CDC has extensive resources regarding global immunization activities for providers and patients. They’ve also published reports on various topics such as vaccination coverage in Haiti, research priorities for global measles and rubella, and maternal and child health interventions in Somalia. Click the CDC link below to learn more about these efforts.

The World Health Organization, United Nations Foundation, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have partnered to invest in vaccine delivery systems throughout the developing world. Click the links below to learn more about these global partnerships to improve and ensure the health of the global population.

Last Updated: 9/17/2013




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