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Immunization of People with Medical Conditions for Ob-Gyns

Some people are at higher risk for serious complications from vaccine preventable disease such as influenza (flu) and pneumonia. Diabetes and asthma among others are some of the most common long-term health conditions that place people at high risk for hospitalization or death if they get sick from flu or pneumonia.

In addition, patients with cardiac disease have an almost 3-fold increased risk for influenza-related hospitalization. The CDC and the ACC have partnered with QuantiaMD to bring you a succinct 5-minute presentation covering recommended Immunization Practices for these high risk patients.

People with health conditions like chronic lung diseases including asthma, diabetes (type 1 and 2), neurologic, and heart disease account for many hospitalizations and deaths during influenza season. Diabetes, asthma, and heart disease are among the most common long-term health conditions that place people at high risk for serious flu complications. Adults with health conditions like asthma, diabetes (type 1 and 2), and heart disease, should receive a flu vaccine as soon as it becomes available.

People with medical conditions like asthma, diabetes, and heart disease should also get the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) to protect against pneumonia. The PPSV vaccine can be given at the same time as the influenza vaccine; ask your doctor about getting this shot.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Influenza Vaccine Summit have resources available for health care providers to assist them in recognizing the benefit of immunization for patients at high risk due to vaccine-preventable diseases.

CDC Resources:

National Influenza Vaccine Summit Resources:

Last Updated: 9/17/2013

Immunization of People with Medical Conditions for Patients

Some people are at higher risk for serious complications from influenza (flu) and pneumonia. Diabetes and asthma among others are some of the most common long-term health conditions that place people at high risk for hospitalization or death if they get sick from flu or pneumonia.

These people should receive a flu vaccine as soon as it becomes available.They should also get the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) to protect against pneumonia. The PPSV vaccine can be given at the same time as the flu vaccine. Ask your health care provider about getting this shot.

People with diabetes (types 1 and 2) are at high risk for flu-related complications. Even when it’s well managed, diabetes can make you more likely to have severe flu disease. Illness can raise the blood glucose (sugar) level. Also, not eating as a result of being sick can cause blood glucose levels to change. These changes in blood sugar level are very dangerous for people with diabetes.

Getting the vaccine is the best way to prevent the flu. People with diabetes should get the flu shot, not the nasal spray.But, if people with diabetes do get the flu, it’s important for them to have a plan for managing their diabetes when they get sick. Talk with your health care provider about “sick day rules.” Visit Flu information for People with Diabetes and Caregivers of People with Diabetes for more information.

Flu is also more serious for people with asthma. Even people with mild asthma are more likely to develop serious health problems and be hospitalized from the flu. Flu can cause breathing problems and trigger asthma attacks. It can also cause pneumonia and other acute respiratory diseases. Getting the vaccine is the best way to prevent the flu. People with asthma should get the flu shot, not the nasal spray.

Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s section on Seasonal Influenza and Asthma for more information.

Visit CDC's site to view the full list of health conditions that put you at highrisk forflu-related complications. Flu.gov also offers information about flu and how it affects people with asthma, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, or arthritis.

Last Updated: 9/17/2013




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